27 Health Tips For Foreign Travel

When you leave the comfort of your home country and travel to different climates and environments abroad, you risk exposure to diseases and health risks. Diseases that are not prevalent in the US such as malaria, dengue fever, rabies and yellow fever are prevalent in other countries. It’s important that you understand what to do in order to stay healthy during your foreign travel.

Vaccinations And Immunizations

Even as you decide on your next destination, do the following:

Check the CDC website for information on prevalent diseases and health outbreaks at your destination

Discuss the list of health risks with your doctor and find out what immunizations and vaccinations you need

Some vaccinations need to be taken several months before travel, so be sure to plan your travel according to your vaccination schedule

If you’re visiting a dengue and malaria prone area, you may need to continually take anti-malarial medication during your travel

Existing Medical Conditions

Understand that you may fall sick while abroad; take precautions in advance. Do the following if you have an existing medical condition: You can also learn about “how to change your facial structure“, click here

Take out sufficient travel insurance when you know that you could fall sick during your travel. You want to avoid major medical bills, if possible, or at least obtain reimbursements for medical treatment on foreign shores

Carry sufficient quantity of prescription medications to last the duration of your trip. Don’t presume that you might be able to buy more medications at your destination; you may not get the same brand, or the same dosage elsewhere

When you get to your destination, register with your home country’s embassy and ask them to refer a suitable hospital and doctor for you.

Visit the doctor at the earliest possible and show your most recent medical reports and your medications. Make sure the doctor is available for you if there’s an emergency

If you have any major allergies or if you suffer from diabetes or similar conditions, instruct your hotel management on emergency help

Carry a card in your wallet at all times, listing allergies, if any, especially allergies to medicines.

If you are a diabetic, make sure the hotel management knows what first aid to provide if you have a hypo or hyperglycemic attack. Write down detailed instructions and leave your glucometer on a table where it’s easily visible.

Make sure your travel insurer knows about existing medical conditions if any. This may hike up your premium, but it’s well worth it if you fall sick and need help with bill payment or reimbursement.

If you have any pre-existing medical condition, check with your doctor how the travel, local climate and pollution levels may affect you

Pre-Travel Consultation And Advice

Before traveling, make sure you consult with your doctor and get some pre-travel consultation and advice.

If you are currently pregnant, or if you have had a baby in the last six months, get your doctor’s clearance for travel

If your medical history includes deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, blood disorders, cancer, etc., make sure your doctor clears you for travel.

If you are taking contraceptives for medical reasons or a hormonal medication such as thyroxin, get your doctor to prescribe quantities for your travel duration. Keep copies of the prescription for proof

General Precautions

Before traveling, check if your prescription medication is legal in the country you plan to visit.

Carry your doctor’s letter detailing your previous and present medical history, recommendations for treatments and medical prescriptions

Inform your friends and family of your travel plans and stay in touch with them via phone, online chat and email. This way, if you’re not in touch for a couple of days, they’ll know to contact the local home country embassy and police station.

Put the number for police and emergency services on speed dial on your cell phone.

Always use condoms; buy a few condoms at a time and don’t use old ones. Be sure to check the expiry dates

Learn the local language for existing medical conditions if any and how to call for emergency help. Also know what local medication brands correspond to your prescriptions.

Food and drink safety

If you must eat local food offered by street vendors, sample a little and then wait to see how well your body accepts the food.

Don’t eat too much of anything; sometimes the body is fine with small portions but will balk at large portions of unfamiliar food.

Keep a list of water and food borne diseases in the specific area.

Always boil and filter tap water before drinking. Make sure that the seal is intact on bottled water.

Keep some anti-bacterial wipes handy all the time, and clean your hands often.

 

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Winning Hands in Blackjack

 

 

When you play blackjack your final hand can only be one of these possibilities ‹ a blackjack, 21, 20, 19, 18, 17, 16 or less, or you could bust.

 

When you bust, you know you automatically lose and when you get a blackjack hand, the worst you can do is tie, and the best is get paid a bonus of 1.5 times your bet. But what are your chances of winning when you stand on your 17  21? You would hope they are pretty good, but that’s not always the case.

 

Let’s take the example of standing on 17 in a six-deck game where the dealer stands on soft 17. Most players are happy to have a 17, and thankfully stand. However, you will lose more money than you win when the dealer shows any card other than a 6. You will lose the most money when the dealer shows a 9, and the least when he shows a 4 or 5. It’s only when the dealer has a 6 showing that you stand a fighting chance of winning some money in the long run.

 

So what’s a player to do? Actually, there is nothing you can do. Hitting a hard 17 would result in even greater Slot Gacor losses, so the lesser of two evils is to stand. Now don’t get me wrong. Often times you will stand on 17 and win a hand, but over time you will end up losing more than you win (except against the dealer’s 6). Standing on 17 is definitely not utopia.

 

Because 17 is not a good hand, this is the reason you should never stand on soft 17 (you should hit or double down). Also in a game where the dealer hits soft 17, a player faces an additional disadvantage.

 

Suppose we end up with 18 and stand. Surely we must fair better than standing on 17. And we do, but not as much as you think. You’ll make money on that 18 in the long run when the dealer shows a 2 through 8 face card, but you’ll lose money against the dealer’s 9, 10 or ace. This is the reason you should hit rather than stand on soft 18 when the dealer shows a 9, 10, or ace.

 

In one of my seminars on casino gambling I asked the audience if they would be interested in the following casino proposition. Namely, they would allow you to bet as much as you want at blackjack and they would give you an automatic 18 on every hand. Would you take that bet? If you did, you would wind up losing about 60¢ for every $100 you wagered. Like it or not, 18 won’t make us a winner when we play.

 

Now what about standing on 19? Surely, this must be a winning hand. Well almost. The exception is when the dealer shows a 10 or ace. If the dealer shows those cards, our 19 still isn’t good enough, and in the long run we will lose more than we win.

 

It’s only when we have a 20 that we really have a strong hand. Against any dealer’s upcard including an ace, we will make money in the long run. Since 20 is such a strong hand, this is the reason 10-10 should never be split and A-9 should never be doubled. You’ve got a winning hand with 20, so it’s best to leave it alone.

 

It shouldn’t come as a surprise, therefore, to find out that about 70% of your total winnings at blackjack arise from being dealt these two hands  A-10 and 10-10. Nearly all the rest of your winnings come from these five hands: 11, 10-9, 10, A-9, and A-8. It’s important therefore to know the correct playing strategy for them because they count so much toward your overall chances of winning. In multiple-deck games, always double down on 11 when the dealer shows 10 or less, and double on 10 when the dealer shows 9 or less. You should always stand on hard and soft 19. With a soft 18, you double down when the dealer shows a 3 through 6, hit when he shows a 9, 10 or ace, and stand on 2, 7, and 8.

 

On the losing side of things, the following hands will account for about 85% of our financial losses: hard 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17. We already covered the 17 and it should come as no surprise that the stiff 12 through 16 hands are overall losers even when we follow the basic playing strategy (if we played by the seat of our pants, we’d lose even more).

 

Statistics are nice to know, but it won’t put money in your pocket. What will add to your piggy bank is knowing the basic playing strategy and betting more when the undealt cards are rich in 10s and aces (i.e. learn card counting). That’s how you can turn the odds in your favor when you play blackjack.

 

Dr. Henry Tamburin is the author of Blackjack: Take the Money & Run and editor of the Blackjack Insider Newsletter. For a free subscription to the newsletter visit www.smartgaming.com. For a free catalog call (888) 353-3234.

 

 

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WHEELCHAIR ATHLETES

Speed of Light is working closely with our partners to ensure that the event is as accessible and safe for as many people as possible to take part.

Applications are welcomed by wheelchair athletes. A route has been designed for wheelchair users to take part wearing specially designed light suits. Due to terrain and the nature of the event, wheelchair athletes will take part in small teams, accompanied by runners who will help navigate the route.

If you are interested in taking part as a wheelchair athlete, please get in touch with the Speed of Lightteam at speedoflight@nva.org.uk to discuss your requirements and how to register. You can also find further information on participating as an athlete here.…

SCHOOLS & COMMUNITY

How can you get involved?

There are a variety of ways in which your group can get involved with Speed of Light. A number of free places are available for schools and community groups to take part as runners or as walking audience members. Your group could also take up volunteer posts to experience the dynamic behind-the-scenes environment of this large-scale event.

This is an excellent chance for everyone to participate in an once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see Arthur’s Seat illuminated at night, and to be part of Scotland’s official artistic contribution to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games celebrations.

Details of all the opportunities as well as registration forms – to be completed and returned to us – are available to download below. If you would like to discuss your requirements, please just get in touch with the Speed of Light team.

Dates available for groups to run and walk:
• Wed 22 August 2012
• Thu 23 August 2012
• Wed 29 August 2012
• Thu 30 August 2012

Dates for volunteers:
Volunteers will be required to commit to several dates within August depending on the role undertaken. For full details please subscribe to the Speed of Light mailing list here and visit our Volunteer page here.

We look forward to hosting your group in August!

Please Note: Group spaces are limited and will be offered on a first come first serve basis

Downloads:
Schools & Community Booklet (size: 1.51MB)

Walking Group Registration Form (size: 123KB).
Running Group Registration Form (size: 131KB)
Running Group Participant Registration Form (size: 180KB)

Further information on opportunities, dates and criteria for runners here.

Take part in a workshop

We’ve been working closely with Edinburgh International Science Festival to develop the technology for Speed of Light. They have created an inspirational workshop programme for primary schools across Scotland.

Power from the People, a workshop on generating green electricity, explores some of the challenges our project presents. For three weeks in August 2012, Speed of Light will transform Arthur’s Seat through a series of night-time events. By using equipment partially designed to harvest energy created by walkers and runners, the hillside will become animated with trails of people covered with light.

In this interactive workshop, your class will help us as we develop the technology needed to generate enough energy to light the landscape. Pupils will work with dynamos, gain an understanding of how they make electricity and look at ways in which we can generate green electricity.

For further information visit Edinburgh International Science Festival website

Cast yourself in this year’s most extraordinary performance!

This August Edinburgh’s Arthur’s Seat is the stage for a remarkable fusion of public art and sporting endeavour. The iconic mountain is brought to life in a mass choreographed act of walking and endurance running, as part of Edinburgh International Festival and London 2012 Festival.

As a member of the walking audience you become part of the work, carrying portable light sources set against the dark features of the hill. A mesmerising visual display unfolds each night on your ascent to the summit as hundreds of runners wearing specially designed light suits take to the intricate path networks below.

Each individual performance is created by collective action, landscape and weather, offering a rare perspective on the cityscape, night skies and the sea and hills beyond.

Audience tickets are now on sale at www.eif.co.uk.We’ve also released additional running spaces too. See here for details.

NVA’s Speed of Light is one of only four national projects, commissioned as part of Legacy Trust UK’s Community Celebrations programme, which aims to build a lasting legacy from the UK’s hosting of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The wider programme extends across eight of Edinburgh’s festivals throughout 2012 with a series of blogs, lectures, events and discussions investigating environmental art, human endurance and the interior experience of running.

NVA produces award-winning and dynamic events in challenging landscapes. Past works include The Storr: Unfolding Landscape on the mountains of Skye, Half Life, Argyll, The Path, Glen Lyon. Permanent spaces include the Hidden Gardens, Glasgow and the current resuscitation of St Peter’s Seminary and Kilmahew woodlands, Cardross.…

THE GRIM RUNNER

NVA’s Creative Director Angus Farquhar has been a runner for 13 years. His own experiences of training for a marathon led him to question why he ran and put his thoughts onto paper for his 2009 book, The Speed of Light.

“The feeling of being up and out on your own, with only two or three people passed on the whole hill run, of the previously unknown becoming part of your extending knowledge of your surroundings, is special and makes the world a richer place.”

For the next 10 months, Angus will be writing a blog of his journey towards Speed of Light 2012: the highs; the lows; achievements and challenges. You can read it here.…

WHY WE RUN

Since the ideas for Speed of Light first emerged, we have been thinking about how we might explore the wider culture of running (and in particular endurance or longer distance) to try and answer some basic questions around why we run.

Join NVA’s Creative Director Angus Farquhar and fellow runner Hayden Lorimer on an outing to hear their thoughts in the film on the left by Annie Griffin, Pirate Productions.

We’ll be entering the world of selected runners – following them as they take to the hill in a seamless display of choreographed mass movement. Psychological and physiological portraits will be presented on the website throughout the run.

We invited a group of prominent thinkers to ponder the value of an experimental investigation of running. These include a science festival director, a professor of biochemistry, a general practice doctor, a psychotherapist, a social geographer, a psychologist and an art curator who met initially to discuss the scope of the work. The resulting conversations – and disagreements – were illuminating, teaching us that the worlds of science and art do not always easily come together! You can read a summary of that discussion here. We’ll be sharing the debate with you as we progress.

You can also subscribe to our mailing list to be kept up to date with all the latest announcements.…